The bigger, the bolder, the better.

Celine_14_1366

 

The reason why I will always love this outfit from the Céline 2015 resort collection is because it is just so much fun. Take that silk crepe blouse for instance. Those billowing sleeves and minstrel-sized buttons belong to a woman who speaks with her hands. The crystal earrings in the shape of pizza slices are sleek yet perfectly bonkers. And the shoes, well, you can’t see them too well here but look at them on the Céline site. See, fun!

 

[Image: vogue.com]

 

 

 

Taking care of Haute Couture: Part II

tumblr_mirggzaNZM1rg5yyto1_500

 

Readers of last year’s post, ‘Taking Care of Haute Couture: Part 1‘ might have noticed my infatuated with haute couture and its conservation. The post back then was inspired by a vintage clothing sale at Christie’s in London; the standout piece being a rare black silk blouse from Dior’s very first collection, ‘La Carolle’ (1947).

Here we are again, then. And again, it’s all about Dior. A visit to the Bond Street store a month or so ago proved to be a fitting precursor to this season’s show at the Musée Rodin. A wonderful sense of history permeates every fibre of the store, and connections between Simons’ designs and those of Monsieur Dior are evident in almost every piece – from the flat, wide round buttons on the newly-interpreted Bar jackets, to the flashes of colour visible under dresses and blouses. But as Tim Blanks rightly says in his review to S/S ’14 collection, ‘the future won’t wait’, and a future it seems, is what Raf Simons has secured for the codified house, with graphic cut outs and vivid-coloured slices of lace fusing seamlessly with the trademark Dior silhouette.

 

IMG_1252

 

The navy wool bustier jumpsuit Stephanie tried on from the 2014 RTW cruise collection (I cried in the street outside after this happened – smooooooth), was just one example of the synthesis between Mr Simons’, and Mr Dior’s craft. It was only after our visit, when I started looking at those founding collections of the late 1940s that I discovered this ‘Eventail’ gown from Autumn/Winter ’48, also made from wool. Excitement for next season is already sky-high.

 

DP151836DP151835

[Images via Tumblr and the Metroplitan Museum of Art]

Taking care of Haute Couture: Part II

tumblr_mirggzaNZM1rg5yyto1_500

 

Readers of last year’s post, ‘Taking Care of Haute Couture: Part 1‘ might have noticed my infatuated with haute couture and its conservation. The post back then was inspired by a vintage clothing sale at Christie’s in London; the standout piece being a rare black silk blouse from Dior’s very first collection, ‘La Carolle’ (1947).

Here we are again, then. And again, it’s all about Dior. A visit to the Bond Street store a month or so ago proved to be a fitting precursor to this season’s show at the Musée Rodin. A wonderful sense of history permeates every fibre of the store, and connections between Simons’ designs and those of Monsieur Dior are evident in almost every piece – from the flat, wide round buttons on the newly-interpreted Bar jackets, to the flashes of colour visible under dresses and blouses. But as Tim Blanks rightly says in his review to S/S ’14 collection, ‘the future won’t wait’, and a future it seems, is what Raf Simons has secured for the codified house, with graphic cut outs and vivid-coloured slices of lace fusing seamlessly with the trademark Dior silhouette.

 

IMG_1252

 

The navy wool bustier jumpsuit Stephanie tried on from the 2014 RTW cruise collection (I cried in the street outside after this happened – smooooooth), was just one example of the synthesis between Mr Simons’, and Mr Dior’s craft. It was only after our visit, when I started looking at those founding collections of the late 1940s that I discovered this ‘Eventail’ gown from Autumn/Winter ’48, also made from wool. Excitement for next season is already sky-high.

 

DP151836DP151835

[Images via Tumblr and the Metroplitan Museum of Art]

The perfect boring.

funnyfacenew funny face PDVD_011

Audrey-in-Funny-Face-audrey-hepburn-4475927-852-480

funny-face-bookshop-model-50s-black-dress

3271299_a_200132b

Audrey Hepburn funny face 50s black polo neck beatnik film screengrab

 

Audrey Hepburn as Jo Stockton at the beginning of Funny Face pretty much encapsulates all of my bookshop-girl fantasies. No surprise then that these FW13 looks from Victoria, Victoria Beckham and Rochas appeal to me on every conceivable level. It’s true, I simply won’t be happy until people assume that I archive books for a living. 

 

YVL_2820.450x675

_ON_0262.450x675

_D7Q0323.450x675

 

[Catwalk images via style.com]

Love is blindness.

Margiela Couture Margiela 7

Margiela 8

Margiela 9

Margiela 10 Margiela 11

_YVS7744.450x675

_YVS7752.450x675

 

So, couture week happened and as always, I am rather late to the party. Surprisingly, it was not Dior that grabbed my heart this season but Maison Martin Margiela. The collection was small, 19 looks to Dior’s 46, and like its newly-invigorated Parisian counterpart, was a breathtaking display of beautifully made, yet thoroughly modern clothes.

As with Margiela’s first couture or ‘artisanal’ collection last year, the House re-appropriated elements from vintage clothing; the focus this time on the 1920s. Original beadwork from the era was transposed onto trench coats, long-line biker jackets and gowns teamed with worn denim and brushwork-patterned silk.

My favourite look, the richly embellished flapper dress/zipped-pullover (last three images) was a perfect synthesis of the 1920s ‘modern look’; all dropped waists, shorter hems and cleaner lines, with sportswear as we understand it today. ‘From the sublime to the sublime’, is how Nicole Phelps described this combination.  I couldn’t agree more.

 

[Images via style.com]